Thoughts on GK1 20th Anniversary Edition

Voodoo got the best of you? Need a hint? Want to talk about Gabriel Knight? This is the place to do it!

Thoughts on GK1 20th Anniversary Edition

Postby adeyke » Tue Jul 26, 2016 7:10 pm

Content warning: I'm going to discuss my opinions of Gabriel Knight 1. Also, there will be spoilers.

During the summer Steam sale, I bought the remake of GK1. I've just now finished my first playthrough and wanted to give my thoughts on it. For that time, I went in almost blind: I'd played the original several times, but I didn't look up what had changed for the remake. I also didn't ever restore a game except to resume playing after a break (I ended up not dying). There was one point where got stuck and wasn't sure if my own knowledge of the game had failed me or if there was a change in the puzzle, so I did peek at a walkthrough for that; it turned out to be the latter. More on that below. I also completely missed the fortune teller. (I did see the empty stall the next day, and Gabriel's reaction there made no sense, given that it's his first time seeing it.) That's the danger of a system where the time automatically advances after you've done all the mandatory actions of the day. I'll be playing through again to get that, get a perfect score (I was 8 points short), and see the other endings.

My general thoughts on the game is that it's... okay. As a remake, I think it does do the original game justice. Some of the changes are good, others not so much. I did notice, though, that the game didn't really keep my attention. For some games, I'll fixate on one so much that I'll play only it until I'm done. With this, however, there'd be days when I didn't touch it at all. That may be because I already know GK1 so well (there's very little suspense left in a replay) and it may because the dialogue-heavy first half of the game is so dry. More on that later.

Now for some more focused criticism:

Bugs

I didn't encounter any game-breaking bugs.

However, I did have a really bad time with skipping dialogue. If I click during dialogue, what I want to have happen is for exactly the dialogue visible on the screen to be skipped, along with the accompanying voice and lip movement. However, what often instead happened is that either the next line also gets skipped, or there's overlap in the voices from the current line and the next, or the dialogue gets skipped but the lips keep moving, or nothing at all happens. This is really annoying, and it's shocking that it got past QA.

There were also some graphical glitches, such as Gabe's heading spinning in circles after the swamp scene and his body contorting in similar ways in Jackson Square. Also, Gabe can just walk through the talisman-containing mound. Just generally, there are a lot a lot of problems with the animations and with the models clipping through things.

UI

I'm very happy with the change to the interface. The verb coin makes a lot more sense than that long list of individually-selected cursors. I'd have preferred if the verb coin allowed "click-and-hold, move, release" functionality instead of just the "click-and-release, move, click-and-release", but that's a relatively minor issue. Also, having a key/icon to show the hotspots is great, as is a key/icon for quick map travel. Lots of thumbs up there.

The game also lets you double-click to move somewhere instantly, but I ended up not needing it. I never really felt that movement through the game was slow or tedious.

The inventory, on the other hand, is a mess. Unlike the normal interface, there's no verb coin, instead using the traditional selectable cursors. Also, it kept the original game's distinction between looking at something and reading it, though here it confusingly used a magnifying glass for the latter (which is distinct from using an actual magnifying glass on it). Also, to use one item on another, you need to click the first item, then click the combine icon, then click the other item (you could instead click combine, then the first item, then the second item, but that could result in a beep from it thinking you were trying to combine whatever you previously had selected with the first item).

The game also has a journal and a way to view some behind-the-scenes stuff, but I never really used those. I'll do that in my next playthrough.

Graphics

They're fine. It really is nice to have them in high-res. It's easy to forget just how low-res the original VGA was; the new ones really are a major improvement. However, the new graphics also don't really blow me away, and there are some times where the different visual styles of the background and the 3D models really clash. The car driving up to the snake mound just looks incredibly fake, for example.

Audio

The music is good.

The new voice acting is also fine. Initially, Gabe's non-Curry voice was very jarring, but it didn't take long for it to just sound normal (though occasional lines later on did still feel odd). The other voice actors were also good, and the quality of the recording is lot better than the original.

There's an exception, though: the non-English parts are sometimes just horribly butchered. If your text has German in it, you should really have an actor who knows German, or at least someone who can coach them phonetically. Listening to the narrator butcher the pronunciation of the library poem was just painful.

Changed puzzles

This is where I have a lot to gripe about. I'm not going to nitpick about the small stuff. I think both that remakes should feel free to make changes where they improve the game and that it's okay for even remakes to budget their resources and focus on the things that really matter even if it means cutting some corners elsewhere.

I do appreciate, for example, that the game slowly unlocks new locations as they become relevant, rather than throwing them all at you to start. And I appreciate that it's no longer snowing in the summer.

However, there are, to my mind, five significant new puzzles, and four of them are just bad.

First, the good one: instead of distracting a cop with beignets, you sneak in through a window. This whole scene also has a lot of disturbing zombie imagery. I think that's thematically a lot more appropriate. Luring cops away with baked goods doesn't really fit with the dark tone of the game at that point.

The other puzzles, however, don't seem to fix a fault in the original. They seem to be puzzles for the sake of puzzles, and their presence makes the game as a whole weaker.

Games have a spectrum of how much world-building matters to them. By world-building, I mean that there's some effort to flesh out the setting so it's a believable place that could exist, with this story just being one of those taking place in it. Potentially, there could be other stories taking place in that same world. And we could think about what happened before our story to get it into the state it's currently in.

I think the Gabriel Knight games belong in that category. A lot of effort is but into making the setting believable (once you accept that, in that world, the supernatural is real). They don't always succeed (the burning torches inside the center of the wheel-within-a-wheel make no sense, nor does Mosely hiding in the drawer, then successfully ambushing Gabriel and leaving without either of them realizing what happened), but they try, at least. And a lot of the puzzles are very down-to-earth: you need money, so you sell your painting; you want to duplicate a bracelet, so you use clay from a lake and give the mold to a jeweler; you want to reconstruct a pattern, so you give it to a technical artist; etc.

At the other extreme are games where the focus is entirely on the gameplay, and the world is just there for decoration. An adventure game of this sort would be entirely about the puzzles. The King's Quest games are more on this end of the spectrum. A lot of the KQ1 puzzles make puzzle-sense (daggers can cut ropes, goats hate trolls, etc.), but the world really exists only for that game. If you try to think about who created the magic bowl and put it in the forest, what kind of kingdom has a population of only a woodcutter and his wife, what the giant does when he's not pacing around carrying the chest, etc., there's no answer.

Then there are the hidden object games. These tend to focus even more strongly on puzzles. The puzzle giving that genre its name is one where you see a scene and are given a list of items to find. As a reward, you're usually given one of the items for inventory. Everything else, however, was only there for the puzzle, and there's no in-game explanation given for why you also needed to collect those other items. It's just that some people like searching scenes for a list of items, so there are games with that sort of puzzle to cater to those people.

I should stress here that I'm not passing a value judgment on those latter games. HOGs are actually a sort of guilty pleasure of mine (though it's more for the set piece puzzles than the actual hidden object puzzles). Puzzles for the sake of puzzles can be quite fun. It's just a matter of having the right expectations; if you try to analyze things and they make no sense, it's frustrating, but if you go in knowing that there's no sense to be had, you can just enjoy the ride.

Apparently, there were initially plans to include actual HOG puzzles in this remake. That was fortunately scrapped, but the puzzles that did make it in are still in that HOG mold of puzzles for the sake of puzzles, even though that harms the world-building the rest of the game tries to do.

One is the extra $20 you need to buy the mask. To get this, you need to talk to the plaques of the tomb of your parents and grandfather (basically just saying "hi" to each). A squirrel will come by and knock over a vase that contains $20. This just makes no sense. There's no line from "I want $20" to "I should make small talk with my dead relatives", and there's no line from "I talked to the dead" to "A squirrel knocks over a vase", and there's no explanation at all about where the money actually came from.

Another is the contraption Magentia uses to determine if you're worthy of knowing the voodoo code. It's a common set piece puzzle, where you have various buttons that change multiple outputs, and you have to figure out which ones to push in order to get the message to appear. Here, also, there's no line between "This person is able to solve a simple puzzle" to "This person should be trusted with the code". It makes no sense that Magentia would have such a machine or would use it for this purpose.

Then there's the puzzle in the Gedde tomb. There's a pile of skulls with five gems embedded in them. You have to push them in the right order to make the special drawer open. This is the puzzle that caught me unawares. And it doesn't make any sense in-universe. If they just wanted to keep people who'd gotten into the tomb from also getting access to that drawer, there would be much simpler and more effective ways to do it. This one doesn't even make sense as a puzzle, since the answer key is provided for you. I'm guessing those are Mosely's notes, and he went to the trouble of actually solving the puzzle, though that also means he entered the drawer that he knew would lock on closing.

Finally, there's the puzzle to enter the Schattenjäger shrine. This time, it's a simple tile puzzle, where you can swap any tiles at will. So to get access to the library, you need to become a Schattenjäger, perform the ritual, and have your sins burned away. To get access to the shrine, however, you need to do that and also be able spend a few minutes arranging tiles. Inside the shrine is the book you need to start your research. So either that book is part of the shrine's normal display (which makes no sense), or Wolfgang accidentally left it there after reading it (which makes no sense), or Wolfgang intentionally hid it there to keep it from you (which makes no sense), or Wolfgang placed it there for you to find it (which makes no sense). Also, as with the skull puzzle, the technology needed to actually create this puzzle and the door-opening mechanism associated with it is astonishing.

As a general rule, the way locks work is that they keep the wrong people out while letting the right person in. The right person could be the one who possesses a physical item (a key), the one who possesses knowledge (a combination or password), or the who one who possesses the right body (iris or fingerprint scanner). A lock that only lets in people with puzzle-solving skills, on the other hand, does not meaningfully distinguish between the right people and the wrong people.

So those puzzles, to me, really weaken the game. They don't hold up to scrutiny, and thus discourage people from thinking about things. Much of the rest of the game, on the other hand, does warrant contemplation, so that's a shame.

Dialogue

This is another one I have a lot to gripe about. In this case, however, it's not that they changed it but that they didn't change it.

For about half the game, most of the content is just dialogue. You go to different locations and talk with different people. There's a lot of interesting stuff there, and it shows just how multi-faceted voodoo is. Unfortunately, the way it's presented tends to just be very dull. There's a face on one side idly nodding around and a face on the other side talking. This is basically the standard for adventure game dialogue (perhaps even a step up, since you don't often have the idle animation of the listener). However, most of those games don't focus so heavily on the dialogue.

To be honest, I'm not sure how to really make it engaging, especially with the technology and budget they have. I guess I'm hoping for more acting and less line reading. That's admittedly very vague. There are, however, a lot of small things that would, at least, be incremental improvements:
  • Give Gabe more actual questions instead of just "What can you tell me about [subject]". This is doubly true if you can ask about the same topic repeatedly. It's just horribly stilted that Gabe would just keep asking the exact same question in order to get more information (and having Gabe just nonchalantly asking Grace what she knows about voodoo at the end of the game is unintentionally hilarious). Potentially, those multiple replies could also just be merged into one longer conversation. Also, what kind of response is he even expecting when he just generically asks people about snakes?
  • Prune the dialogue tree. There are basically two ways to use the dialogue system: just ask about the yellow-highlighted subjects that you know are relevant, or ask about everything. In the latter case, Gabe will end up asking a lot of silly things, and just generally being very rude. Sometimes learning that a character doesn't know something (or at least, doesn't admit to knowing something) is interesting, but in a lot of cases, both the player and the characters really know beforehand that nothing meaningful can come from a topic. Also, if a character doesn't want to talk about a subject, there's no need for the second line about them really not wanting to talk about it.
  • If the dialogue tree is currently empty, just don't let Gabe initiate conversation. Ditto for dialogue subtrees. Gabe knows if he actually has a question to ask or not.
  • Right now, the volume of the background music is decreased during the dialogue. However, it's at full volume in the topic selection list. The constant up and down is unpleasant. It could just be quiet the whole time.
User avatar
adeyke
Oldbie
 
Posts: 562
Joined: Wed Sep 16, 2009 11:47 pm
Location: Bühlerzell, Germany
Gender: Male

Re: Thoughts on GK1 20th Anniversary Edition

Postby Rath Darkblade » Thu Jul 28, 2016 9:09 am

Generally a very good review, adeyke. I too encountered some of these things (not all), and I also went back to try and catch the things I missed.

Some more specific thoughts...

adeyke wrote:Bugs

...I did have a really bad time with skipping dialogue. If I click during dialogue, what I want to have happen is for exactly the dialogue visible on the screen to be skipped, along with the accompanying voice and lip movement. However, what often instead happened is that either the next line also gets skipped, or there's overlap in the voices from the current line and the next, or the dialogue gets skipped but the lips keep moving, or nothing at all happens. This is really annoying, and it's shocking that it got past QA.


It's funny, but I don't remember the dialogue at all. This may be a reaction from how many times I played the original GK1, but I didn't pay much attention to it because I remember it so well. (Yes, GK1 is still my favourite).

I just tried it and, you're right - if you click through the dialogue, the characters' lips keep moving for a second or two. It's funny, but I don't remember it from my first play-through.

adeyke wrote:There were also some graphical glitches, such as Gabe's heading spinning in circles after the swamp scene and his body contorting in similar ways in Jackson Square. Also, Gabe can just walk through the talisman-containing mound. Just generally, there are a lot a lot of problems with the animations and with the models clipping through things.


Gabe's head spins in circles? I don't think I ever saw any of this! :shock: Should I go back and look?
------------------------------
I had very little problem adjusting to the new interface. It would have been nice if the inventory followed the same mechanics, but I found it functional and not too problematic.

That said, I agree that after a while (especially in time-critical situations), finding the right inventory item and doing what you need to do is very tricky.
------------------------------
I agree about the graphics, too. VGA seemed like a major breakthrough in its own time, but the new graphics obviously help to track down the right items on the screen.

I'm afraid I didn't paid too much attention to the familiar old cutscenes, so I must have missed whether the car driving up to the snake mound looked fake. *blush* I'll have to go back and see.
------------------------------
I also agree about the audio. It wasn't too long before I got used to Gabe's non-Curry voice, and the other voices were fine.

I'm not an expert on German, obviously, but I performed a few pieces by Wagner and Mahler in the past and I studied (and was coached on) the pronunciation for those. Even without that, though... I just listened (again) to the new Gabe reading the Drei Drachen poem and reading the English-German dictionary, and I agree. The new Gabriel reads them too fast, puts pauses in the wrong places, and definitely mangles the "ch" sound. It sounds like "Drei Drahen Kriehen..." Bleh.

The only reason I can think of that this was kept is, perhaps, that Gabriel is not a native German speaker (and doesn't take anything very seriously), so he can't be expected to do this flawlessly.
------------------------------
The changed puzzles threw me off a little. I didn't think about it so deeply at the time, but you're right. The latter three reminded me of puzzle-solvers that I played in the past: for instance, in Murder on the Orient Express, one of the puzzles is reconstruct a torn map to find where a killer might be hiding, and another is solve a sliding lock puzzle to unlock a Chinese box and get an item you need). In that game, the puzzles aren't part of the original book, but they make some sense in the game because they give the player a push in the right (or wrong) direction. In GK, they don't make much sense.

As for the extra $20 to buy the mask... this puzzle stumped me completely. I tried the logical places (like the cash till in the shop, or maybe Grandma's house - I thought, did I miss something? Did Grandpa leave another legacy of some sort?), but couldn't get anywhere. You're right - I thought the whole puzzle made no sense.
-------------------------------
Finally... the dialogue. Again, it's funny - but perhaps we think the dialogue is dry and dull because we've heard it before in the original GK1? So, if we'd never played GK1 before, perhaps it would sound new and fresh? I'm just conjecturing, since there was heaps of dialogue about voodoo in the original, too.

Adeyke wrote:...There are, however, a lot of small things that would, at least, be incremental improvements:
[list][*]Give Gabe more actual questions instead of just "What can you tell me about [subject]". This is doubly true if you can ask about the same topic repeatedly. It's just horribly stilted that Gabe would just keep asking the exact same question in order to get more information (and having Gabe just nonchalantly asking Grace what she knows about voodoo at the end of the game is unintentionally hilarious). Potentially, those multiple replies could also just be merged into one longer conversation. Also, what kind of response is he even expecting when he just generically asks people about snakes?


In the original, I think Gabe had two questions - "What can you tell me about [subject]?" and "Any more you can tell me about [subject]?" or, in the case of "personal" questions, "Tell me more about [subject]" (where [subject] is Grace or New Orleans). Incidentally, I thought the "personal" questions and answers are hilarious.

I think the original game also gives Gabe the option to ask Grace about voodoo near the end of the game. I cracked up laughing at her response (and how exasperated she is that she has to say it): "You're the expert, not me!" I'm not sure whether it's unintentional or not - I just thought it was a way to give Grace one more chance to get at Gabe. ;)

Thoughts?
Rath Darkblade
The Cute One
 
Posts: 3480
Joined: Fri Oct 24, 2008 5:15 am
Location: Lost in Translation
Gender: Not specified

Re: Thoughts on GK1 20th Anniversary Edition

Postby adeyke » Thu Jul 28, 2016 10:14 am

Rath Darkblade wrote:
adeyke wrote:There were also some graphical glitches, such as Gabe's heading spinning in circles after the swamp scene and his body contorting in similar ways in Jackson Square. Also, Gabe can just walk through the talisman-containing mound. Just generally, there are a lot a lot of problems with the animations and with the models clipping through things.


Gabe's head spins in circles? I don't think I ever saw any of this! :shock: Should I go back and look?


I suspect it's not entirely reproducible. It might be random or somehow influenced by the system it's running on. I just know that it happened to me.

I'm not an expert on German, obviously, but I performed a few pieces by Wagner and Mahler in the past and I studied (and was coached on) the pronunciation for those. Even without that, though... I just listened (again) to the new Gabe reading the Drei Drachen poem and reading the English-German dictionary, and I agree. The new Gabriel reads them too fast, puts pauses in the wrong places, and definitely mangles the "ch" sound. It sounds like "Drei Drahen Kriehen..." Bleh.

The only reason I can think of that this was kept is, perhaps, that Gabriel is not a native German speaker (and doesn't take anything very seriously), so he can't be expected to do this flawlessly.


My complain wasn't about Gabe, since he does have the excuse of not knowing the language. However, if a character canonically does know a language, the voice acting should reflect that. And the specific line that so bothered me came from the narrator, who isn't supposed to represent any particular character, so the mispronunciation there can't be intentional, or even excused.

Finally... the dialogue. Again, it's funny - but perhaps we think the dialogue is dry and dull because we've heard it before in the original GK1? So, if we'd never played GK1 before, perhaps it would sound new and fresh? I'm just conjecturing, since there was heaps of dialogue about voodoo in the original, too.


I fully concede that, if the dialogue itself is fresh and new, that would make it more interesting.

There was actually a bit of a conundrum for me when playing it. Sometimes, when I replay a game, I'll just skip past the a lot of the text to get on to the more interesting parts. However, for this game, the dialogue is such a big part of the game that I'd be missing out on a lot of the experience if I did that. So I either miss out on the game or get bored by it. I did, however, also want to see how good the new voice acting is like (and also, skipping the dialogue didn't always work right, anyways).

However, even for a first-time player, the stilted and awkward aspects of the dialogue would still be a problem.

Adeyke wrote:...There are, however, a lot of small things that would, at least, be incremental improvements:
[list][*]Give Gabe more actual questions instead of just "What can you tell me about [subject]". This is doubly true if you can ask about the same topic repeatedly. It's just horribly stilted that Gabe would just keep asking the exact same question in order to get more information (and having Gabe just nonchalantly asking Grace what she knows about voodoo at the end of the game is unintentionally hilarious). Potentially, those multiple replies could also just be merged into one longer conversation. Also, what kind of response is he even expecting when he just generically asks people about snakes?


In the original, I think Gabe had two questions - "What can you tell me about [subject]?" and "Any more you can tell me about [subject]?" or, in the case of "personal" questions, "Tell me more about [subject]" (where [subject] is Grace or New Orleans). Incidentally, I thought the "personal" questions and answers are hilarious.


Huh. You're right. At least in some cases, the remake actually makes the dialogue worse than the original.

I think the original game also gives Gabe the option to ask Grace about voodoo near the end of the game. I cracked up laughing at her response (and how exasperated she is that she has to say it): "You're the expert, not me!" I'm not sure whether it's unintentional or not - I just thought it was a way to give Grace one more chance to get at Gabe. ;)

Thoughts?


The line I meant is on day 7, after Grace rescues Gabe from the bayou conclave. When asked about voodoo, Grace says "I know more than I ever cared to! I wish you never messed with this Voodoo stuff in the first place." That's appropriate. However, in the remake, the question Gabe poses to elicit this response is just a flat "What do you know about Voodoo?", exactly the same as on day 1.
User avatar
adeyke
Oldbie
 
Posts: 562
Joined: Wed Sep 16, 2009 11:47 pm
Location: Bühlerzell, Germany
Gender: Male

Re: Thoughts on GK1 20th Anniversary Edition

Postby Tawmis » Thu Jul 28, 2016 1:48 pm

adeyke wrote:Content warning: I'm going to discuss my opinions of Gabriel Knight 1. Also, there will be spoilers.


Very nice write up... Which has reminded me... that I have never played (finished) past Day 1 of the remake...
User avatar
Tawmis
Grand Poobah's Servant
 
Posts: 9466
Joined: Wed Oct 08, 2008 1:19 am
Gender: Not Specified

Re: Thoughts on GK1 20th Anniversary Edition

Postby mendosa » Sun Sep 04, 2016 6:37 am

Nice review, adeyke. I agree with most of your and Rath Darkblade's statements and I can confirm that the dialogue skipping did not work correctly. And I noticed some other issue - if you skip a dialogue line or when you double click to make Gabe move immediately to selected area of the location, you can see the background changes. It is especially visible in Bookstore, you see "air flow" - this dust (or whatever it is) rapidly changes position. This is propably due to the time/animation sequence break.

There was something we could call a bug - luring the mime to the police motorbyke was extremely difficult. But in June 2016 Phoenix Online released a new patch for this problem and at this moment both GOG and Steam have the newest version of the game. Well, the heck - they ported game engine to Unity 5.3, which makes my translation for this remake useless as it won't install at all, and even the newest tools for Unity won't succesfully edit game resources - but this is for another thread, sorry.

I want to write my opinion about those new puzzles in the remake. First, the squirrel. Just a dull puzzle: your Granny encorouges you to go visit the family tomb, you go there, you get 20$! It would be a way more logic, if Granny gave Gabriel those 20 when he returned from the cemetary.

Second, Magentia Moonbeam and Ask the Loa Machine. This is another silly puzzle, completely unreasonable. I can only explain it saying, that Magentia is just... crazy ;) . BTW, Magentia caused one of my mistakes in the translation patch for the original game. When she decodes the voodoo message she gives a good translation for the most of it, but she states that "fwet kash" might be "fresh cash" and unfortunately I followed her "translation". I finally realised that I made a mistake (none of the testers found it) and that made me wonder: how reliable source of information about voodoo such a voodooienne can be? Fwet kash is visible in the Voodoo Museum and even professor Hartridge mentions it in his open lecture.

One funny thing about the lecture - in the original game Gabriel falls asleep during this lecture, but he records it. In the remake he also sleeps through the lecture, but due to the interfrace change he has no tape recorder, but he keeps taking notes. That made me wonder if he is a lunatic? How could he take notes while beeing asleep? ;)

The Shadow Hunter Archives, the Graphic Novel and "Pause" are nice add to the game, but it is something that would not exist without the original game release, so it is hard to say if we should give a plus to the remake or the original GK.

I personally didn't like the "Zombie People Police" - I know that it corresponds with the mummies in African Mound, but I preferred the previous version - fat policeman is always hungry, so he leaves the station for something to eat. ;)
User avatar
mendosa
Sierra Obsessed
 
Posts: 144
Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2010 4:40 am
Location: Cracovia, Polonia, Universum
Gender: Male

Re: Thoughts on GK1 20th Anniversary Edition

Postby adeyke » Sun Sep 04, 2016 11:02 am

Magentia not understanding "fwet kash" is intentional. Her new age understanding of voodoo is all about gris gris and fortunetelling; she doesn't know about the tools used in voodoo rituals. So even though she was able to translate the voodoo code, the result didn't make sense to her, and she instead had guessed that they'd written nonsense or used the code wrong.

That's actually something I like a lot about the game. It does a good job of showing many different perspectives on voodoo. Within the GK universe, voodoo is real, and there's some trace of that real voodoo in how the various characters understand it, even though most of them don't see the big picture. Instead of a strict dichotomy between people who know about voodoo and those who are just completely ignorant of it, there are a lot of shades of grey.

I did also have trouble with the mime. It's just an annoying puzzle.

And that's a good point about the $20. I think sometimes game designers get so much into the mindset of puzzle creation that they forget about more common sense solutions, like just borrowing that money.

As for the lecture, the original also wasn't great in that regard. The tape just records the exact same thing Gabriel experienced; when he stops being able to pay attention to the lecture, so does the tape.
User avatar
adeyke
Oldbie
 
Posts: 562
Joined: Wed Sep 16, 2009 11:47 pm
Location: Bühlerzell, Germany
Gender: Male


Return to The Gabriel Knight Series

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest